Opening up conversation

Today I wanted to open up a conversation with you guys about a recent comment on my post from Wednesday, “I would prefer not to.”

The commenter goes by “A Layman” but was “M.E.B” at time of commenting, and their blog can be found here. Their comment:

 

It is a good concept that you bring up. My first question to you, which can only be answered subjectively, “What does it mean to live.” For me, I rebel because there is too much in this society. I rebel against the instant gratification. The instant creativity. Have a blog, everyone is a writer. There is nothing wrong with this, but having everything at our fingertips kills creativity, rather than enhancing it.
Creativity is a struggle. A struggle within and a struggle without.I don’t find working in an office, which I did after spending years getting a degree, enjoyable at all. I actually regret going to college at all. It was a complete waste of my time. In my opinion, I could have spent that time living life. Living it the way I would live life. Free. Another subjective word, of which it would take far more than a blog page to define what freedom means to me. In a few words, freedom is to be free of the society. Free of commercialization. Free of the hell that has formed around me by rich tycoons who control the colleges, the institutions and the government. Free, simply to be me. Not some droid with thoughts implanted into my mind to perform the duties of the society. I am not a member of a society. I am member of humanity.

 

This inspiring comment really made me think. I agreed with it, deep in my heart. I think a lot of us have the gut instinct to rebel and run away from all our responsibilities…but the realist in me was holding back. Freedom, in its nature, is a scary thing. It’s risky to be free, easier to go along with the system put in place by society. I can never quite decide which is better, for me or for others: to play by the rules, or to change the rules so the game is fairer.

I’d like to hear your opinions on this, since mine are far from being concrete. Without judgment, share your ideas. As a community we can have a great Friday discussion on freedom, creativity, safety, and society.

April: Creative writing

Anyone interested in a month of creativity?

I signed up for the A to Z challenge, which means a blog post every day in April, not counting Sundays. Each day is themed after a letter in the alphabet, so April 1 is A, April 2 is B, and so on.

I was just going to continue with the Playground style of just writing what happens in life, but I was a bit worried about those days when nothing interesting happens, or all of the things happening in April ruining my flow. So I thought, why not do it a bit differently for April? Something I can plan ahead for, something that can keep it fresh and add a bit of flavor.

So I think I’ll write a bit of fiction every day, based on the letter. They won’t be very long, or even particularly stories–some may very well be just scenes. But I wanted to post some fiction here since I created the blog, and this gives me a chance to do so.

And don’t worry, if something comes up I’ll do an additional post that day as well as the A to Z challenge. Sundays will be the same, and things will be back to normal in May (or earlier, if I mess up the challenge).

I know it’s a bit of a change, but I need to get my creative juices flowing again, and with the travel I’ll be doing in six months and the journalism venture I’m on now that ends in June, I figured this blog is already going to go through phases. Just like life.

I’m excited to share April with you:)

 

Fingernails versus Music

Good morning! Did yesterday’s Pulp Fiction and Kurt Vonnegut fangirl come as out-of-nowhere as it felt like it did to me? Movie/book/television program fangirling will likely appear from time to time. Can’t help it, I go to art school and spend a lot of time reading and watching things. Artsy introvert, what can I say?

Nonetheless, artsy introvert I am, I sometimes take a break from consuming and change gears into creative mode. Writing is my most common endeavor, but I sometimes like to draw, and sometimes (less commonly recently, sadly) I play music.

I play cello and ukulele, but since a cello is too bulky to bring to college I mostly just play my little uke, nicknamed Luna. I’m not great, but I can mess around and play chords I look up online. It’s a lot of fun, and relaxing as well.

I don’t often have the time to play music, and often go weeks without. That means when I do pick up Luna, my fingernails have grown out.

I like long fingernails, I think they’re quite pretty and, frankly, useful. Try peeling an orange without fingernails, I dare you. Or washing your hair–gosh, fingernails help so much with shampoo.

Anyway, my nails grow out, and when I try to play ukulele, my fingernails are too long and get in the way of playing. This is when I have to choose between my fingernails or playing music: or, more broadly, between beauty or creativity.

The Greeks prized beauty, and you can see it in their sculptures. The Romans favored realism. The most prominent example I have seen is the difference between how they sculpted their wine god, Dionysus/Bacchus. The Greeks made him look beautiful, high and mighty, staring at grapes intensely. The Romans made him look drunk, a far more accurate (probably) representation.

Neither is better or worse, in my opinion. I like art, and they’re both well-sculpted works. One prized beauty, and one prized realism, and here we are. My question is, did beauty limit the Greek artists? If you are expected to make something beautiful, and limited by that, it hinders creativity.

Let’s look at more examples. Picasso’s a good place to start. If he painted “beautifully” he’d be a footnote rather than a household name.

When Disney animators were drawing sketches of Elsa and Anna, the two sisters in Frozen, they commented on how hard it is to make two pretty women look different. Why couldn’t one be a smidge average? Why are we limited to pretty things?

Creativity is wild, untamed, ugly and raw. And I rip my fingernails off every time I play, because I’ll be damned if Somewhere Over the Rainbow is ruined by pretty nails.